Gender Equality Duty: A Seminar Monday 14th May 2007

Despite the Sex Discrimination Act being on the statute book for over 30 years, inequality remains a feature of the modern workplace. The pay gap between men and women remains wide, with part-time women earning nearly 40% less than men. In an attempt to progress the long awaited call for equality, the Gender Equality Duty (GED) will come into force in April 2007. This legislation requires public authorities to take action to eliminate unlawful sex discrimination and harassment, and promote equality of opportunity between women and men. The GED is significant in that it places a legal responsibility on public authorities to actively promote equality between men and women, instead of relying on individuals making complaints. All public authorities, including local government, central government, NHS trusts, and schools, will be required through a number of different specific duties to: Prepare and publish a gender equality scheme, with clear gender equality objectives

12th August 2022 – 3:16 am

Despite the Sex Discrimination Act being on the statute book for over 30 years, inequality remains a feature of the modern workplace. The pay gap between men and women remains wide, with part-time women earning nearly 40% less than men.

In an attempt to progress the long awaited call for equality, the Gender Equality Duty (GED) will come into force in April 2007. This legislation requires public authorities to take action to eliminate unlawful sex discrimination and harassment, and promote equality of opportunity between women and men.

The GED is significant in that it places a legal responsibility on public authorities to actively promote equality between men and women, instead of relying on individuals making complaints. All public authorities, including local government, central government, NHS trusts, and schools, will be required through a number of different specific duties to:

  • Prepare and publish a gender equality scheme, with
    clear gender equality objectives
  • Report on progress annually
  • Review the gender equality scheme at least every 3
    years

The GED will ensure that public authorities investigate employment procedures including: equal pay, recruitment policies, flexible working patterns and occupational segregation. But as with most legal duties, the effectiveness of the law depends on trade unionists understanding, monitoring and enforcing the law at work. This seminar will provide delegates with an informed insight into what the law says and how it can best be applied to your workplace.

The challenge now is to ensure that the duties provide a robust
framework for implementing gender equality in the workplace.