Redundancy and the law: fear and economic uncertainty at work

Redundancy and the law: fear and economic uncertainty at work a seminar Wednesday 8th July 2009 1:30pm – 4:15pm NUT Hamilton House, Mabledon Place, London WC1H 9BD map here organised by The Institute of Employment Rights about the seminar Current redundancy law means that UK workers are among the cheapest to sack in Europe. At the BMW plant in Cowley, the management sacked four shifts, 850 temporary staff at an hour’s notice, with no redundancy pay. How could it get to this?

8th July 2009 – 1:30 pm - 4:15 pm

Redundancy and the law: fear and economic uncertainty at work
a seminar
Wednesday 8th July 2009
1:30pm – 4:15pm
NUT Hamilton House, Mabledon Place, London WC1H 9BD
map here
organised by
The Institute of Employment Rights

about the seminar

Current redundancy law means that UK workers are among the cheapest to sack in Europe. At the BMW plant in Cowley, the management sacked four shifts, 850 temporary staff at an hour’s notice, with no redundancy pay. How could it get
to this?

When statutory redundancy pay was introduced through the Redundancy Payments Act 1965, the limit was set at twice he average weekly wage while coverage among workers was just short of universal (96 per cent.) Last year, less than half (40%) of the working population were covered.

In 2000, the Government changed the method of calculating the statutory limit from earnings to those in line with the retail prices index. In late March 2009, the RPI went below zero, which means that statutory redundancy pay is being reduced. This is why, in Lyndsey Hoyle MP’s words, “We need to reconsider and reword the legislation.”

Hoyle’s Statutory Redundancy (Amendment) Bill by introducing the link to earnings, as opposed to the RPI, would protect the value of statutory redundancy pay in the
future.

It is clearer than ever before that the needs of workers – first to protection against arbitrary closures and second to adequate compensation should closure occur need to be reasserted. So what does the law say? What are the strengths and weaknesses and how should the law be improved? What can trade unionists do above and beyond the limitations of the legal framework?

programme

  • 1:30 Registration
    1. 1:50 Introduction from Chair, Carolyn Jones, Director IER
    2. 2:00 Redundancy: the nuts and bolts of the law

Rob Smith, Thompsons Solicitors

  1. 2:30 Questions
  2. 2:45 Tea and coffee
  3. 3:00 Statutory redundancy pay and the private sector: the campaign for adequate compensation

Roger Jeary, Unite

  1. 3:30 Defending jobs, defending education – protecting staff from arbitrary closures in our universities

Matt Waddup, UCU

  1. 4:00 Discussion
  2. 4:15 Close

Speakers

Roger Jeary is Director of Research at Unite the Union
Carolyn Jones has been Director of the IER since its inception in 1989
Rob Smith, Thompsons Solicitors
Matt Waddup is Head of campaigns, organising, recruitment and training at the University and College Union

Who should attend

The seminar will be of great interest to trade unionists, employment lawyers, personnel and health and safety specialists, academics and students and those concerned with the development of public policy.

How to book

To reserve your place, complete the online booking form below or you can pay with a card on the phone or send a cheque, made payable to IER.

CPD, NPP and EPP accreditation

This seminar counts for credit hours under the Law Society’s Continuing Development Scheme and the General Council of the Bar’s New Practitioners’ Programme and Established Practitioners’ Programme.

Additional Information

Details of nearby hotels are available from the office. Name changes are accepted up until the time of the event. Delegates who advise IER of their cancellation more than 15 working days in advance will receive a credit note with 10% deduction for administration.

How to get there

Nearest tubes: Russell Square, Goodge St and Tottenham Court Rd. Nearest stations: Kings Cross and St Pancras and Euston.

Cost

IER subscribers and members £45.00
Trade unions £60.00
Commercial £120.00

Book your place now!